How is payment to research subjects for participation in studies viewed and assessed by IRBs?

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Paying research subjects in exchange for their participation is a common and, in general, acceptable practice.  Payment to research subjects for participation in studies is not considered a benefit that would be part of the weighing of benefits or risks; it is a recruitment incentive. FDA recognizes that payment for participation may raise difficult questions that should be addressed by the IRB.  For example, how much money should research subjects receive, and for what should subjects receive payment, such as their time, inconvenience, discomfort, or some other consideration.  

In contrast to payment for participation, FDA does not consider reimbursement for travel expenses to and from the clinical trial site and associated costs such as airfare, parking, and lodging to raise issues regarding undue influence.  Other than reimbursement for reasonable travel and lodging expenses, IRBs should be sensitive to whether other aspects of proposed payment for participation could present an undue influence, thus interfering with the potential subjects’ ability to give voluntary informed consent.  Payment for participation in research should be just and fair. The amount and schedule of all payments should be presented to the IRB at the time of initial review. The IRB should review both the amount of payment and the proposed method and timing of disbursement to assure that neither are coercive or present undue influence.

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About the Author
Proxima CRO Team
Ellie Reynolds
Quality Assurance

Ellie Reynolds is from Dallas, Texas and is a Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs Associate for Proxima. She just completed her M.B.E. in Bioengineering at Rice University and previously received her B.E. in Biomedical Engineering from Vanderbilt University. Prior to completing her master's degree, she worked in strategy consulting for biotech and pharma companies and is eager to combine her educational background and professional experience in this role.  

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