How can informed consent be obtained from illiterate English-speaking subjects?

BACK TO FAQs

A person who speaks and understands English, but does not read and write, can be enrolled in a study by "making their mark" on the consent document, when consistent with applicable state law.

A person who can understand and comprehend spoken English, but is physically unable to talk or write, can be entered into a study if they are competent and able to indicate approval or disapproval by other means. If (1) the person retains the ability to understand the concepts of the study and evaluate the risk and benefit of being in the study when it is explained verbally (still competent) and (2) is able to indicate approval or disapproval to study entry, they may be entered into the study. The consent form should document the method used for communication with the prospective subject and the specific means by which the prospective subject communicated agreement to participate in the study. An impartial third party should witness the entire consent process and sign the consent document. A video tape recording of the consent interview is recommended.

 

 

About the Author
Proxima CRO Team
Stephanie Mull
Director of Project Management

Stephanie has over 20 years of clinical research experience working from the site, CRO and sponsor perspectives. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from Concordia University in St. Paul, MN, with a degree in Natural Science - biology and math.

Related FAQs:
More Questions? We're here to help!
SPEAK WITH A SPECIALIST